What's on the Truck?

What’s on the Truck? SWEET CORN!

All summer long, we’re shining the spotlight on some of the fruits and veggies you might find on a Farmer Foodshare truck and on their way to stores, restaurants and nonprofits around the Triangle. This week: Sweet Corn!

All through the month of July, sweet corn is FREE for members! Sourced from…you guessed it! Farmer Foodshare!

All through the month of July, sweet corn is FREE for members! Sourced from…you guessed it! Farmer Foodshare!

What is It?

Corn, mainly known as sweet corn or maize in North Carolina, is a starchy plant common in cuisine from a variety of cultures. Corn is predominantly harvested as a cereal crop, used to make flours, bread, and more. It can be eaten raw off the cob or cooked by steaming, stir-frying, baking—just about any way you could imagine! Healthy ears of corn are protected by a strong, fibrous outer stalk of leaves with no damage or bruising.

Did you know? 

  • The average ear of corn has 800 kernels in 16 rows.

  • Cobs always have an even number of rows.

Why Should You Eat it?

Corn is a great source of dietary fiber and necessary carbohydrates. It’s also a good source of Vitamin C, folate, niacin, and potassium.

How Do You Eat It? 

Shirliey F. in Oakland, CA shared with us a delicious recipe for warm farmers market summer corn and potato pesto salad that she created:

“For the pesto, blend together garlic, toasted walnuts, extra virgin olive oil, coarse gray sea salt, and fresh basil. For the salad: celery, celery leaves, corn on the cob cooked for scant 2 minutes and then cut off cob, boiled yellow potatoes (roasted sweet potatoes would be amazing too!), lots of parsley, lightly boiled zucchini, sea salt and ground pepper to taste. Mix together and eat warm!”

The beauty of corn is that is can be enjoyed so many different ways!  Here are a few ideas:

Grilled Cream Corn

Raw Corn and Avocado Salad

Perfect Corn on the Cob for Dummies

Spicy Cornbread


For more facts, nutrition information, and recipes, see our Sweet Corn Fact Sheet!


Check out our whole resource guide full of veggie fact sheets and recipes in English and Spanish!

What's on the Truck this Month? ZUCCHINI!

All summer long, we’re shining the spotlight on some of the fruits and veggies you might find on a Farmer Foodshare truck and on their way to stores, restaurants and nonprofits around the Triangle. This week: Zucchini!

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What is Zucchini?

Zucchini is a variety of summer squash. Zucchini is usually dark green (even black!), but certain types can also be found in lighter shades and even yellow. Zucchini looks like an elongated cucumber or green squash. The flesh is soft and succulent and often lighter than the outer, darker skin.

Did you know?

This “vegetable” is actually an immature fruit. Also: zucchini were first brought to the United States from Italy in the 1920s.

Why should you eat it?

A zucchini has more potassium than a banana! It’s also a great source of Vitamin C, dietary fiber, folate, and beta carotene.

How do YOU eat it?

David P of Durham told us: “We have a thing that makes noodles out of zucchini, great for Pad Thai! And for those who need a lot of help to eat veggies, the Good Lord gave us ranch dressing.” Let us know your suggestions!

More ways to eat it:

Summer Minestrone

Best Baked Zucchini

Zucchini Bread

Learn more at our Zucchini Veggie Fact Sheet, packed with recipes, nutritional information, fun facts, and more!

Check out our whole resource guide full of veggie fact sheets and recipes in English and Spanish!

What's on the Truck this month? BEETS!

In honor of Eat Your Veggies month, we’re highlighting just a sampling of what you might find on a Farmer Foodshare truck and on their way to stores, restaurants and nonprofits around the Triangle during the month of June. Next up: BEETS!

What are beets?

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Beets are root vegetables. They come in beautiful rich colors and have a big, sweet flavor. Generally 2-3 inches in diameter, they have the highest sugar content of any vegetable. Beets come in 3 colors; red, white, and yellow or golden beets. Red beets are the most commonly grown and watch out(!)…they stain. In addition to having a delicious root, a beet’s greens are edible as well.


Did you know?

From the Middle Ages, beetroot was used as a treatment for a variety of conditions, especially illnesses relating to digestion and the blood.

Why Should You Eat it?

Despite their sugar content, beets are low in calories and fat, yet high in valuable vitamins and minerals. In fact, they contain a bit of almost all the vitamins and minerals that you need!

Also: Beets are a good source of fiber, which is beneficial for digestive health, as well as reducing the risk of a number of chronic health conditions.

How do you eat it?

Asta in Chapel Hill shared this easy and delicious idea: “Roast mixed root veggies with olive oil, salt, pepper— beets, carrots, cauliflower, potatoes sweet and regular, Brussels sprouts, etc. Throw in garlic and onion, too—whatever takes your fancy.”

More ways to eat your beets:

Warm Beet and Spinach Salad

Smoky Beet Hummus

Olive Oil Baked Beet Chips

For more facts, nutrition information, and recipes, see our Beet Fact Sheet!

Check out our whole resource guide full of veggie fact sheets and recipes in English and Spanish!

What’s on the Truck this month? KALE!

Farmer Foodshare delivers fresh produce each week, and what’s on the truck depends on what’s in season here in NC. In honor of Eat Your Veggies month, we’re highlighting just a sampling of what you might find on a truck for the month of June. First up: versatile, healthy, delicious KALE!

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So, what is kale?

Kale is a member of the brassica family (like cabbage, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts) and is thought to have descended from wild cabbage. Kale has long been one of the most popular greens due to its comparatively mild taste. Varieties include curly green, lacinato (also called dinosaur or Tuscan kale) and Russian red kale.

Did you know?

Kale has been cultivated over 2000 years and was the most commonly eaten green in Europe until the end of the Middle Ages! 

How do you eat it?

Good question! We asked YOU how you like to eat your veggies, and you had great responses!

Jessica G. of Durham had this creative suggestion: “Pesto! You can use any greens—my people like kale and parsley best—and any nut. We usually have pecans or almonds on hand. Add garlic, olive oil, cheese is optional, and my secret ingredient is about a tablespoon of maple syrup!”

Beth P. in Durham gave us her tip for getting her kids to eat their veggies: “Leafy greens are great in smoothies—my kids will drink them as long as they get to push the buttons on the machine, and there’s fruit besides.”

Here are some ideas and recipes from the Farmer Foodshare archives:

Simple Sautéed Kale - Brown an onion and 2 cloves of garlic in olive oil. Add roughly cut pieces of washed kale and sauté until color brightens and leaves become tender, just a couple of minutes. Season to taste and serve while warm.

Stuffed Sweet Potatoes and Greens and Beans

Chicken and Kale Pizza Bake

Want to know more? Our Veggie Fact Sheet on Kale has tons of recipes, nutritional info, facts and more!

We have a whole resource guide full of veggie fact sheets and recipes in English and Spanish!