wholesale-market

Small Tasks, Big Impact: Volunteer Spotlight on Farmer Foodshare's own Amy Gregory

April is Volunteer Appreciation Month! To kick it off, we’re featuring the multitalented Amy Gregory of Farmer Foodshare’s Wholesale Market team. She can do it all! Here’s Amy’s take on why she volunteers, and how small things can make a big difference.

Small Tasks, Big Impact

By Amy Gregory

Live Better. Help Often. Wonder More.

To say these words are why I volunteer is over simplifying, but pretty accurate. I think most people enjoy the "feels" that come from helping others. Finding opportunities within our own communities is typically the hardest part. When we think about where to start, what can can we contribute, where is the greatest need, it can be daunting. Volunteering doesn't have to be grandiose; in fact, often it’s the smaller tedious things that require attention and represent the greatest need. For me to find these opportunities to volunteer, I have only to ask around the office!!

Yes, I work for Farmer Foodshare, but I am also a volunteer! You can find me doing things like packing produce for distribution during the holidays, working Donation Stations at local farmers markets, taking photos at our speaker series, arranging flowers at our Roots & Revelry celebration, or just doing small things to help spread the word about the amazing things Farmer Foodshare does in the community.

As a member of our Wholesale Market Team, I am involved in the logistics of getting products from our farmers into the community. Our Wholesale Market delivers fresh NC produce to Durham Public Schools throughout the school year. We are very proud to be part of Durham Bowls, a program conceived by Food Insight Group, Durham Public Schools and various local chefs. You can learn all about this great program here Durham Bowls.

Farmer Foodshare’s Wholesale Market worked with Durham Public Schools to acquire some novel ingredients that were required for these innovative recipes. One of these ingredients was pureed carrots lots and lots of pureed carrots!

This is where contributing small things can make a BIG difference. Portioning out 228 quarts of carrot puree was not difficult, but it did require some time and the use of a certified kitchen space. With the help of my ever-enthusiastic and accommodating husband and The Butchers Market Raleigh, we made it happen—and it was loads of fun! Not only did we enjoy spending quality time together, knowing our efforts contribute directly to Durham Public School children was incredibly rewarding.  



Ready to get in on the fun?

Check out our volunteer opportunities

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Amy and Jeff have a blast volunteering together

Amy and Jeff have a blast volunteering together

Do you carrot all? Cause that’s a lotta carrots.

Do you carrot all? Cause that’s a lotta carrots.

Amy’s intrepid husband Jeff was undaunted by the task!

Amy’s intrepid husband Jeff was undaunted by the task!

GOOD GREENS: Sesame Collards

COLLARD GREENS! YUM! A hearty green that grows well through winter and spring + packs a lot of calcium!   Image from https://www.thespruceeats.com/mixed-greens-with-ham-3053954

COLLARD GREENS! YUM! A hearty green that grows well through winter and spring + packs a lot of calcium!
Image from https://www.thespruceeats.com/mixed-greens-with-ham-3053954

Sesame seeds  are an excellent source of copper, a very good source of manganese, and a good source of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, zinc, molybdenum, Vitamin A, several B vitamins, selenium and dietary fiber.

Sesame seeds are an excellent source of copper, a very good source of manganese, and a good source of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, zinc, molybdenum, Vitamin A, several B vitamins, selenium and dietary fiber.

Equipment

  • Large pot

  • Kitchen knife

  • Cutting board

  • Measuring cup

  • Tablespoon

  • Teaspoon

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil (or oil of your choice)

  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger

  • 2 large garlic cloves, minced

  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce

  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper

  • 3 bunches collard greens (1 ¾ pounds)

  • Salt

  • 3 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds

Instructions:

  • In a large pot, heat the oil

  • Add the ginger, garlic and crushed red pepper and cook over high heat, stirring until fragrant, about 30 seconds.

  • Add the collard greens in 2 batches, wilting the first before adding more.

  • Season with salt and cook over high heat, stirring occasionally, until the greens are just tender and the liquid is nearly evaporated, about 10 minutes.

  • Add the soy sauce, stir

  • Stir in the sesame seeds, transfer the greens to a bowl and serve.

Adapted from: https://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/quick-asian-style-collard-greens by Taylor Jost, Bonner Leader Intern from UNC