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Corn

Corn, mainly known as sweet corn or maize in North Carolina, is a starchy plant common in cuisine from a variety of cultures. Corn is predominately harvested as a cereal crop; used to make flours, bread, and more. It can be eaten raw off the cob or cooked by steaming, stir-frying, baking—just about any way you could imagine! Healthy ears of corn are protected by a strong, fibrous outer stalk of leaves with no damage or bruising.

Best Storage Practices:

Store ears of corn with their husks intact in cold, refrigeration. Separate corn in vegetable drawer or crisper. Properly stored corn can last between 4 and 8 days.

Fun Ways to Eat and Cook:

Corn is a versatile food that can be eaten in a variety of ways: raw, steamed, boiled, or stir-fried. Toss corn in with rice or eat it as a side with any meal. The natural salty and starchiness of the corn helps provide balanced tastes.

Selecting Sweet Corn:

Choose sweet corn with unwilted husks and green colors. Discoloration, bruising, or damage signals past-due or improperly harvested corn. Corn itself should be bright yellow to pale yellow, and sometimes even white.

Why it’s Good to Eat:

  • Great source of dietary fiber and necessary carbohydrates
  • Good source of Vitamin C, folate, and niacin
  • Provides a good source of potassium

When it’s in Season:

Corn is in prime harvesting season between April and early September. Coastal soils lend to a better harvest, but sweet corn is native to all parts of North Carolina including the mountains and piedmont.

How it’s Harvested:

Corn can be harvested by hand or machine. Machine harvests tend to cut shorter shanks and less green husks which could prevent moisture loss, therefore preventing spoilage.

Recipes:

Corn Salad—Mix corn, (bell or spicy) peppers, onions, and tomatoes in bowl. Spice with cilantro, oregano, salt, and crushed pepper. Drizzle with oil and serve cold. Enjoy!